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thomasjay32:

frankethor:

zuky:

did-you-kno:

Source

The Scott sisters will remain on parole and be required to pay the state of Florida $52 per month for the rest of their lives.

I think it is important to also mention that they were released under the condition that one sister donate an organ to the other sister to save her life after neglect and abuse by the prison staff caused her health to deteriorate.
Also, it should be noted that the witnesses to the crime repeatedly said that the sisters were not the ones who robbed the restaurant.
If I remember correctly, the two women are relatives of an activist, or something to that effect and may have been targeted just because the cops couldn’t get to the family member. As far as I recall, neither women were themselves activist.

Bruh

thomasjay32:

frankethor:

zuky:

did-you-kno:

Source

The Scott sisters will remain on parole and be required to pay the state of Florida $52 per month for the rest of their lives.

I think it is important to also mention that they were released under the condition that one sister donate an organ to the other sister to save her life after neglect and abuse by the prison staff caused her health to deteriorate.

Also, it should be noted that the witnesses to the crime repeatedly said that the sisters were not the ones who robbed the restaurant.

If I remember correctly, the two women are relatives of an activist, or something to that effect and may have been targeted just because the cops couldn’t get to the family member. As far as I recall, neither women were themselves activist.

Bruh

jonasbrothers:

I’m in mutuals with a lot of people I’ve never spoken to and if that’s you then I just want you to know that I’ve definitely thought about talking to you at one point and then got scared

Around 8 Questions for Patrick Kyle, asked by Daria Tessler for Gridlords

gridlords:

One of the things I love so much about your comics is your dialogue. Your dialogue feels really natural while doing a great job of telling the reader about the world your characters live in, and the characters’ understanding of that world and of one another without clunky exposition. You seem to work fairly fast which makes me think your dialogue writing process may be somewhat spontaneous. Is it? How do you cram so much information into such simple phrasing?

Yes, the dialogue in my comics is usually written as I am drawing — it’s as spontaneous as the artwork. I don’t do a lot of revision, but I try to be careful and concise if I’m writing something that I feel like helps the reader understand the story or would clarify what is happening in the artwork. There’s a lot of situations in Distance Mover especially where I felt like I needed to reinforce the artwork with writing since a lot of the images are non-representational. I worry a lot about redundancies when I’m writing. I try to be pragmatic when I’m composing a sentence in both my writing and in real life, I hope.

image

In your conversational podcast with Dan Berry you mentioned that in relation to trying to write out your stories before you draw them you were reading more. What kinds of things do you read as learning material or inspiration for story writing?

I’ve just been reading more fiction lately. I’m trying to get into it and I don’t really know what books I like or what books are really good. I have a tough time picking things out unless someone recommends them to me. In the last little while I’ve read George Saunders, Lydia Davis, Steve Erickson, Thomas Pynchon, Tao Lin —a weird mix of stuff. Most recently I’ve been really interested in Blake Butler’s work. I can’t think of an author who I have enjoyed so thoroughly. For lack of proper academic language, for me his writing is like the literary equivalent of an Ocrilim song. Atmospheric, oppressive, powerful, haunting.

Your worlds seem to contain complex rules that parallel human societies, but also have an alien flavor to them. Do you intentionally consider the social rules and physical laws within the worlds you create or do these rules evolve through your sort of stream-of-consciousness writing style?

They mostly evolve through stream-of-consciousness writing but It stems from a world view as well.  Most social constructs and customs we deal with in real life are things that people just made up — I don’t feel like we should be precious with them. It’s important and fun to reinterpret society, even if it’s just in a comic book.

image

You make a lot of completely abstract images. You seem to have a vocabulary of repeatable motifs that you work with in different formations on the page, including the spider web, the crackled planetoid form, the ladder, or broken ladder parts, various lines and blobs. what are these abstract constructions about for you? When you get into that abstract world of forms do you miss the narrative or is the narrative element still there for you because these symbols or shapes have meanings in your mind? I think sometimes the meanings of these objects are made explicit in your comics, but perhaps the meanings shift and change? Is it like a secret language, a conversation with yourself that your audience may not be able to decipher?

There’s a tradition of repeating motifs in graphic arts, in Guston or Basquiat’s work, etc. that I suppose I’m trying to uphold. I think I was initially inspired though by Marc Bell, who uses a lot of repeating motifs and phrases in his art and comics. I try to cycle the ones I use pretty frequently; maybe in the course of a few months or a year they will all change. I don’t feel like I miss narrative when I’m working in abstraction. Sometimes I feel like I really have something I want to say and I’ll say that in writing, but I really just enjoy the act of drawing and sometimes I just want to do that. My goal is generally just to create nice compositions, but people can derive whatever meaning they like from those images.

I was also interested in how you feel the abstract images connect with the cryptic text in your New Comics 4.

I’m a little embarrassed to admit that the text and images from the first portion of New Comics 4 were created completely independently of each other. I wrote a prosey story and I wanted to put it somewhere so creating the drawings to accompany it was an attempt to turn it into a comic of sorts. I think it works — The drawings would be boring on their own and the writing would be boring on its own.

image

Your book Phasing, it’s an intriguing combination of abstract images with a narrative comic embedded in roughly the middle of the book. There are stylistic elements that tie the whole thing together. I am curious how you see your abstract work relating to your comics and how both elements within that book relate to the title you chose, “Phasing.”

That book is a collection of images I created specially for that publication and then reprints of two zines that were sort of stylistically relevant. My abstract work, my comics and my illustration work have always been kind of separate things that change independently but inform each other.  I always actively try to change my work and change the way I draw. I don’t think there is much of a purpose of pursuing art if you are not doing this. The title “Phasing” obviously relates to phases I go through as an artist, but it’s  also a reference to a retired Magic: The Gathering (I am a fan) mechanic from the ’90s where the cards you have come in and out of play turn by turn. I thought that was kind of poetic and a funny personal metaphor for appearing in one form, going away, changing, and coming back.

Artists or craftsmen appear often in your comics and discuss making things. This interest in the broad concept of “art” seems somehow reflected in the deconstructed nature of abstract elements that build the environment of your narratives. Is there something specific you’re trying to get at or is it just for fun or maybe just semi-autobiographical? Or some specific concept or artist you are referencing or inspired by?

It’s a world that I know, so I think it’s easy for me to depict characters who have an artistic vocation. It’s mostly for fun.

image

I’ve talked to a few artists who feel frustrated that they can’t push beyond literal renderings of their subject matter, and want to imbue their drawings with more abstract elements but just can’t bring themselves to do it, to loosen up, to reinterpret the forms of their subject matter. I know in interviews you’ve said you seek new ways to draw things. Is this a sort of constant cerebral thing in your mind as you draw? Like do you repeat a motif on the page and then say to yourself, “No, reinvent this!” or does a form, a subject evolve slowly over time? Do you have any advice for folks, as to how to loosen up/ abstractify their imagery?

It evolves over time. I’ll represent something in a specific way and as I mentioned previously I’ll reuse that drawing here and there until I’m really fed up and then I’ll change it. If I feel really frustrated and tired of what I’m doing I’ll change my approach by holding my tool in a different way, using a different medium or I’ll allow myself to make decisions while drawing that I might normally view as mistakes. Comfort impedes growth. If you’re interested in pursuing abstraction forget about making things “correct” and acknowledge that you’re working on a piece of paper. It doesn’t have to be a photograph and it doesn’t have to be real or representational because it’s not real — it’s just a piece of flat paper. You can do whatever you want with it.

Patrick Kyle will be performing at Gridlords 27 at the IPRC on Friday October 10th at 7:30 pm along with Simon Hanselmann and Michael Deforge.

supamuthafuckinvillain:

maarnayeri:

brooklyn-maoist47:

Nothing ever changes with white people and their support for killer pigs. 

I wonder what the response of these white people would be if they were confronted about the fact that only a short 50 years ago, it was active Nazis that held up signs akin to theirs.

And this is how racism stays alive. U bring ur kids to shit like this and it’s a cycle that never goes away.

supamuthafuckinvillain:

maarnayeri:

brooklyn-maoist47:

Nothing ever changes with white people and their support for killer pigs. 

I wonder what the response of these white people would be if they were confronted about the fact that only a short 50 years ago, it was active Nazis that held up signs akin to theirs.

And this is how racism stays alive. U bring ur kids to shit like this and it’s a cycle that never goes away.

susiethemoderator:

icurvelames:

breanlove:

😂😂😂 Am I wrong fa laughin?

Nope

*Sleeps peacefully tonight*

susiethemoderator:

icurvelames:

breanlove:

😂😂😂 Am I wrong fa laughin?

Nope

*Sleeps peacefully tonight*

lendoro:

baddadsquad:

gentle-puffer-fish:

  • falling asleep on someone’s chest
  • wrapping your arms around each other
  • synching heartbeats and breathing slowly
  • falling asleep in big t-shirts and underwear
  • forehead kissies and murmured affections
  • naps
  • MONSTER TRUCKS

image

whitepeoplestealingculture:

postracialcomments:

mauving:

littleblackmanifesto:

trillaryclinton:

thugkitchen:

Look at what the fuck we got in the mail this morning. Less than a month away until the dopest cookbook ever drops.
Preorder your copy now or get left behind this fall.  

nah bruh, can’t support this shit at all. 


I definitely can’t fuck with it, especially since the authors are white. Black Americans literally can’t get jobs because they speak this dialect, but when white people do it all of a sudden it’s edgy and novel. Just another example of white people profiting off of doing something black people have been persecuted for.

boycott this. also their faces

Folks what the fuck

*pukes*

whitepeoplestealingculture:

postracialcomments:

mauving:

littleblackmanifesto:

trillaryclinton:

thugkitchen:

Look at what the fuck we got in the mail this morning. Less than a month away until the dopest cookbook ever drops.

Preorder your copy now or get left behind this fall.  

nah bruh, can’t support this shit at all. 

image

I definitely can’t fuck with it, especially since the authors are white. Black Americans literally can’t get jobs because they speak this dialect, but when white people do it all of a sudden it’s edgy and novel. Just another example of white people profiting off of doing something black people have been persecuted for.

boycott this. also their faces

Folks what the fuck

*pukes*

hnnhlcy:

snoopdad:

now this is the kind of content i’m looking for

i just woke up and this made me tear up

lechetherat:

f3nnekin:

inner—utopia:

Bless that one person in every group that is like “keep going, I’m listening” and encourages you to finish your story even when everyone else is talking over you.

stirfriedawesomesauce:

memewhore:

sizvideos:

Video

Grow a whole fucking cabbage in the time it takes to do that.

Without a Judeo-Christian moral code in its society, Japanese scientists decide to play god.

shining-magically:

my dash today

lachicanarosie:

bio-mechanic:

taniafonseca:

We all know the Aztecs by that name, but it was not actually a name that they ever called themselves. The Westerners who came up with the name ‘Aztecs’ likely took it from one of the original places that the Aztecs lived around the twelve century, called Aztlan, which was in the Northern part of Mexico. However, the Aztecs themselves actually referred to themselves as Mexica, which is actually where the name for the country of Mexico originally came from.
Mexica (Meh-shee-kah) is the original Nahuatl (the so-called Aztec language) way of pronouncing Mexican, Mexicano, Chicano and Chicana. The Mexica was the last of our great Anahuac civilizations (1325 to 1521). Mexica is the only one of our cultures and civilizations which has enough surviving material from which we can reconstruct our Anahuac nation. The Mexica were victims of an ethnocide that left no one today who can authentically call themselves Mexica, much like in Italy there is no one who can authentically call themselves Roman. Therefore, the rest of us who have lost all of our civilization identity and culture or tribal identity and culture, and even those of us who have a civilization or tribal identity, can and should embrace Mexica identity as a collective identity for all of us that we use in order to reconstruct our Anahuac nation and as a means of Liberation. Mexica is our point of unity and our means of reconstructing all of our nation.
Nican Tlaca is our Nahuatl (Mexica) language way of saying “We the people here”, in reference to all of us who are Indigenous to Cemanahuac (what Europeans call “the Western Hemisphere”) and more specific to Anahuac which is the northern part of Cemanahuac (which is called “North America”). Nican Tlaca refers to all of the people of our race in the “Western Hemisphere”. We are not Indians or indios because those are the people of a nation called India!
#MEXICA #MEXICAN #INDIGENOUS #INDIGENOUSROOTS #nicantlaca #indigenouswarrior #1500s #mexicapride #brownpride #AMERICANHISTORY #vivamexico #mexicolindo

“The Mexica were victims of an ethnocide that left no one today who can authentically call themselves Mexica, much like in Italy there is no one who can authentically call themselves Roman. Therefore, the rest of us who have lost all of our civilization identity and culture or tribal identity and culture, and even those of us who have a civilization or tribal identity, can and should embrace Mexica identity as a collective identity for all of us that we use in order to reconstruct our Anahuac nation and as a means of Liberation. Mexica is our point of unity and our means of reconstructing all of our nation.”
This really rubs me the wrong way, and I won’t get into a long explanation of why b/c I have talked about why this rubs me the wrong way, but a shortened version:
 No the Mexica aren’t dead, their descendants (the Nahua people)  are still alive and well. and many can still speak their language, so stop referring to them in the past tense. Also, it is important that indigenous people have solidarity, but not at the cost of sacrificing and disregarding our own unique identities, traditions and histories, that is not solidarity.

Also I would like to point out that not all of Mexico was MexicaThere were other tribes such as Acatec, Amuzgo, Chatino, Chiapaneca, Chichimeca, Chicomuceltec, Chinanteco, Chocho, Ch’ol, Chuj, Cochimi, Cocopa, Cora, Cuicateco, Guarijio, Huasteco, Huave, Huichol Indian, Ixcateco, Jacalteco, Kickapoo, Kiliwa, Kumiai, Lacandon, Mam, Matlatzinca, Mazahua, Mazatec, Mixe, Mixtec, Mocho, Nahuatl/Mexica, Oaxaca Chontal, Opata, Otomi, Paipai, Pame, Pima Bajo, Popoloca, Popoluca, Purepecha, Seri, Tabasco Chontal, Tacaneco, Tarahumara, Tectiteco, Tepehua, Tepehuan, Tlahuica, Tlapanec, Tojolabal, Toltec, Totonac, Trique, Tubar, Tzeltal, Tzotzil, Yaqui, Yucatec Maya, Zapotec
Don’t let them generalize us, We were the first melting pot of rich culture

lachicanarosie:

bio-mechanic:

taniafonseca:

We all know the Aztecs by that name, but it was not actually a name that they ever called themselves. The Westerners who came up with the name ‘Aztecs’ likely took it from one of the original places that the Aztecs lived around the twelve century, called Aztlan, which was in the Northern part of Mexico. However, the Aztecs themselves actually referred to themselves as Mexica, which is actually where the name for the country of Mexico originally came from.

Mexica (Meh-shee-kah) is the original Nahuatl (the so-called Aztec language) way of pronouncing Mexican, Mexicano, Chicano and Chicana. The Mexica was the last of our great Anahuac civilizations (1325 to 1521). Mexica is the only one of our cultures and civilizations which has enough surviving material from which we can reconstruct our Anahuac nation. The Mexica were victims of an ethnocide that left no one today who can authentically call themselves Mexica, much like in Italy there is no one who can authentically call themselves Roman. Therefore, the rest of us who have lost all of our civilization identity and culture or tribal identity and culture, and even those of us who have a civilization or tribal identity, can and should embrace Mexica identity as a collective identity for all of us that we use in order to reconstruct our Anahuac nation and as a means of Liberation. Mexica is our point of unity and our means of reconstructing all of our nation.

Nican Tlaca is our Nahuatl (Mexica) language way of saying “We the people here”, in reference to all of us who are Indigenous to Cemanahuac (what Europeans call “the Western Hemisphere”) and more specific to Anahuac which is the northern part of Cemanahuac (which is called “North America”). Nican Tlaca refers to all of the people of our race in the “Western Hemisphere”. We are not Indians or indios because those are the people of a nation called India!

#MEXICA #MEXICAN #INDIGENOUS #INDIGENOUSROOTS #nicantlaca #indigenouswarrior #1500s #mexicapride #brownpride #AMERICANHISTORY #vivamexico #mexicolindo

The Mexica were victims of an ethnocide that left no one today who can authentically call themselves Mexica, much like in Italy there is no one who can authentically call themselves Roman. Therefore, the rest of us who have lost all of our civilization identity and culture or tribal identity and culture, and even those of us who have a civilization or tribal identity, can and should embrace Mexica identity as a collective identity for all of us that we use in order to reconstruct our Anahuac nation and as a means of Liberation. Mexica is our point of unity and our means of reconstructing all of our nation.”

This really rubs me the wrong way, and I won’t get into a long explanation of why b/c I have talked about why this rubs me the wrong way, but a shortened version:

 No the Mexica aren’t dead, their descendants (the Nahua people)  are still alive and well. and many can still speak their language, so stop referring to them in the past tense. Also, it is important that indigenous people have solidarity, but not at the cost of sacrificing and disregarding our own unique identities, traditions and histories, that is not solidarity.

Also I would like to point out that not all of Mexico was Mexica
There were other tribes such as Acatec, Amuzgo, Chatino, Chiapaneca, Chichimeca, Chicomuceltec, Chinanteco, Chocho, Ch’ol, Chuj, Cochimi, Cocopa, Cora, Cuicateco, Guarijio, Huasteco, Huave, Huichol Indian, Ixcateco, Jacalteco, Kickapoo, Kiliwa, Kumiai, Lacandon, Mam, Matlatzinca, Mazahua, Mazatec, Mixe, Mixtec, Mocho, Nahuatl/Mexica, Oaxaca Chontal, Opata, Otomi, Paipai, Pame, Pima Bajo, Popoloca, Popoluca, Purepecha, Seri, Tabasco Chontal, Tacaneco, Tarahumara,
Tectiteco, Tepehua, Tepehuan, Tlahuica, Tlapanec, Tojolabal, Toltec, Totonac, Trique, Tubar, Tzeltal, Tzotzil, Yaqui, Yucatec Maya, Zapotec

Don’t let them generalize us,
We were the first melting pot of rich culture

nomoremrnicespice:

11nextelchirp:

thugkitchen:

Look at what the fuck we got in the mail this morning. Less than a month away until the dopest cookbook ever drops.
Preorder your copy now or get left behind this fall.  

Don’t buy this book! This blog is run by corny white people pretending to be black by awkwardly inserting “motherfuckin” and “shit” in their recipes. 


Read Thug Kitchen: A Recipe in Blackface for a breakdown of their shenanigans, including the racist commercial they released to promote this racist book under their racist brand.
If you want an actual “thug” perspective on food that’s not a total mockery and actually stands for something, consider The Hood Health Handbook, written by actual black people who actually give a fuck instead of exploiting black culture for $$$.

nomoremrnicespice:

11nextelchirp:

thugkitchen:

Look at what the fuck we got in the mail this morning. Less than a month away until the dopest cookbook ever drops.

Preorder your copy now or get left behind this fall.  

Don’t buy this book! This blog is run by corny white people pretending to be black by awkwardly inserting “motherfuckin” and “shit” in their recipes. 

image

Read Thug Kitchen: A Recipe in Blackface for a breakdown of their shenanigans, including the racist commercial they released to promote this racist book under their racist brand.

If you want an actual “thug” perspective on food that’s not a total mockery and actually stands for something, consider The Hood Health Handbook, written by actual black people who actually give a fuck instead of exploiting black culture for $$$.

shitrichcollegekidssay:

Michael Dunn was rightfully found guilty today for the murder of Jordan Davis and his face was all

image